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Greek Yogurt

I love this homemade yogurt over other yogurt because of its mellow flavor. With so many homemade yogurts they are quite tangy and require too much sweetener to mask the tanginess of the yogurt. Not so with Greek yogurt.

Ingredients

1 gallon of raw, whole milk
2 cups Greek yogurt starter (Obtain plain Greek Yogurt from Costco for initial starter)

Instructions: Use a wire whip to gently fold yogurt starter and raw milk together into a pan that can be placed into your oven. Stir it in starter until it is spread throughout all the milk. Then place into oven at 100 degrees and allow to sit for 24 hours. Remove from oven and then spoon yogurt into containers that can be stored in your refrigerator. Place in refrigerator until ready to use. Can be enjoyed plain, or sweetened, and with various recipes. You can save back two cups of this starter that may be later used to start any future batch of yogurt. Enjoy!

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I used Costco's brand of Greek yogurt, but perhaps the 24 hours was not long enough. will try once more and leave it longer. Thanks!

How would you make this dairy free? Can I do the same method using coconut milk with a coconut milk based yogurt starter? 

This recipe is not intended to be dairy free; the lactobacilli involved are cultures that specifically thrive in dairy products. As for a coconut-based yogurt, I've not made one, but have made a coconut water drink that is fermented by lactobacilli. I started it by adding a a probiotic start to the water and allowing it to sit on the counter overnight. In the morning it was fizzy and fermented.



Janalyn said:

I've heard that the bacteria in the yogurt and the bacteria in the raw milk react in a funny way to make the yogurt sour.  It's as if the bacteria are fighting one another.  I've had this same reaction with kefir in raw milk.  Have you heard of or experienced such a thing?  Do you heat your raw milk up first?

Also, do you turn the oven off or leave it for 24 hours at 100 degrees? 

There is a difference between cultured and sour as in bad. Anyone used to store bought kefir milk would say mine is sour. I have been making kefir for over 5 years now from raw milk, same culture as i started with and shared the grains with hundreds of local friends. If your kefir is sweet then it still has the load of carbs/sugars it started with. the grains eat the sugar in exchange for probiotics that is passes to the milk.  Yogurt is a little that way as well. It eats the sugar in the milk. if it doesn't turn tart then nothing happened. Yogurt is harder to maintain in raw milk than pasteurized. My mom has a batch of yogurt from the same start over 20 years old that requires no heat to make. When i use it in raw milk I lose it eventually unless I make a Mother batch that is heated. I imagine this style of yogurt is easy to maintain as it cultures at low heat. I have heard it's hard to control the bacterial and probiotic strength when you take it from a commercial yogurt and should use a culture from a reputable source. I stick with kefir, it's so easy and the cheese makes great sandwich spreads, veggies dips, salad dressing  and so forth. All my kefir is made with raw milk, that is all we have in our house and all my kids will drink! 



Sally Farb said:

...I stick with kefir, it's so easy and the cheese makes great sandwich spreads, veggies dips, salad dressing  and so forth. All my kefir is made with raw milk, that is all we have in our house and all my kids will drink! 

Great post Sally! Thanks for your insights!

Are commercial yogurts good for those with milk intolerance? I have been incorporating them into my meals now and they seem to make a funny film in my mouth after eating. Does it not cause the dopamine levels to rise as do other animal products?

You can obtain pure kefir and yogurt starts from virtually any health-food store, as well as online by doing a google search for kefir or yogurt starts. The friendly bacteria in a kefir or yogurt start act similarly to the friendly bacteria used to leaven bread, wherein much that is in milk that might otherwise cause issues to you is pre-digested by friendly bacteria, such as the lactose (milk sugar). Kefir research also suggests anti-allergen properties, but it is not believed by most researchers that the proteins casein or whey, which cause allergies to many people, is pre-digested. It is important to distinguish between different types of casein because casein in the milk from goats and sheep varies considerably from that of cows. Most farmed cows, such as holstein and friesian, produce milk with a fragment of protein called A1 beta-casein. It is this A1 fragment that produces an opioid-like reaction in the body that leads to dopamine production. Originally cows produced milk with a fragment of protein called A2 beta-casein. A2 beta-casein does not cause the same opioid-like reaction as A1 beta-casein. If you can obtain mature white coconuts, these can be shelled, peeled, and blended in their juice to create a nice cream. You can add either yogurt or keefir start to this to also enjoy a nice dish.

Are you saying that now, as opposed to many years ago, all milk contains this A1 beta-casein with opioid-like reaction? Would there be a difference in a cow raised organically on a family farm?

James Simmons said:

 Most farmed cows, such as holstein and friesian, produce milk with a fragment of protein called A1 beta-casein. It is this A1 fragment that produces an opioid-like reaction in the body that leads to dopamine production. Originally cows produced milk with a fragment of protein called A2 beta-casein. A2 beta-casein does not cause the same opioid-like reaction as A1 beta-casein. 

Not all cows produce A1 milk. A2 Corporation has standardized tests to determine which cows are A2. Guernsey cattle are nearly all A2 milk producers, with a very small percentage that are not. Brown Swiss cattle have the second highest percentage of A2 producers. Goats are A2 milk producers. This science is still evolving, so what I tell you next year may be different, depending upon how this fairly new science evolves. Search it online and get a feel for it yourself if milk is a problem in your home. Search A1 or A2 Milk. From what I can tell, it is strictly a genetic factor and not how the cow is raised or fed. The company that does the testing can do it from a single hair of any cow. That is probably the only way to know for sure. Even some Holsteins produce A2 milk, but far fewer in percentage as compared to the Guernsey. Best! 

Julie Greenman said:

Are you saying that now, as opposed to many years ago, all milk contains this A1 beta-casein with opioid-like reaction? Would there be a difference in a cow raised organically on a family farm?

James Simmons said:

 Most farmed cows, such as holstein and friesian, produce milk with a fragment of protein called A1 beta-casein. It is this A1 fragment that produces an opioid-like reaction in the body that leads to dopamine production. Originally cows produced milk with a fragment of protein called A2 beta-casein. A2 beta-casein does not cause the same opioid-like reaction as A1 beta-casein. 

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